All posts tagged autobiography

Review: Jag håller tiden

Jag håller tidenJag håller tiden by Åsa Grennvall
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Åsa Grennvall is back with a sequel to the critically acclaimed Deras ryggar luktade så gott (Their backs smelled so good). In a sense, this book starts right where the previous one ended and deals with how Grennvall starts her own family and how this leads to her finally dealing with the relationship with her dad and his (non-existent) role as a father. It is, as always with Grennvall’s comics, emotionally exhausting to read, and you just want to beat up her seemingly emotionally crippled father for what he has done and not done during Grennvall´s childhood. But the book also contains a great deal of warmth and optimism in the new-found family life, which makes reading the story bearable although it fittingly enough ends with a discussion between the character Åsa and Death … Grennvall is one of the sharpest, most personal comics artists we have in Sweden, and her last two graphic novels are among the best, most literary ever made in Sweden.

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Review: Palimpsest

PalimpsestPalimpsest by Lisa Wool-Rim Sjöblom
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Palimpsest is an autobiographical graphic novel about a Swede who was adopted from Korea searching for her origins. Sjöblom has previously made shorter comics and illustrated children’s books, but this is her first full-length graphic novel.

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Review: Framtidens Arab 1 and 2

I recently wrote a review of the two first volumes of Riad Sattouf´s masterpiece L’Arabe du future for the Swedish newspaper Svenska Dagbladet. It can now be found in its digital form here.

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Review: Tack och förlåt

Tack och förlåtTack och förlåt by Fanny Agazzi
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Fanny Agazzi makes her book debut with a graphic novel of how it is to have a close friend dying abruptly and way too early in life. The story is autobiographical and woven into the story of how her friend Nabil passed away and the mental breakdown that followed are other recurring themes such as trying to get pregnant despite a number of failures,attempts to function socially and keep a job.

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Ok, so maybe I’m obsessing a bit much about this book…

Ok, so maybe I'm obsessing a bit much about this book...

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Review: Det kunde varit jag

Det kunde varit jagDet kunde varit jag by Sara Olausson
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

This really is a book that touches it’s reader. No-one in Sweden at least will have missed out on the fact that comics artist Sara Olausson has a burning commitment to changing the fate of an EU migrant/beggar that she has befriended. They have both appeared in virtually all Swedish media these last few years, in a deliberate campaign by Olausson to generate a debate and raise interest, both for general issues of poverty, EU migrants and the situation of the Roma, as for the specific fate of Felicia.

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Review: Var ska jag lägga mitt huvud?

Var ska jag lägga mitt huvud?Var ska jag lägga mitt huvud? by Rakhsha Razani
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

A poignant autobiographical tale of escaping from your home country and trying to build a new reality in another part of the world altogether. The main character moves from Iran to England to study in the 1970s, but moves back home at the revolution in 1979 to try to help rebuild the country. Nothing, however, was as it seemed and she and her little family must soon flee, and end up as refugees in Sweden. Razani retells all of her experiences in a very personal text, which reads as if she was sitting next to you talking, and this is illustrated with 2-3 images per page.

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